The Imperative Subterfuge: A Review



Hitler v/s Gandhi’ is a theme many people have contemplated. Instead of just stopping there, popular satirist blogger Rickie Khosla goes ahead and weaves an entire novella around this interesting premise. It was indeed interesting seeing serious fiction from a writer whose humorous works you have been acquainted with. The title of the book is quite intriguing and that along with the Nazi Swastika on the cover illustration makes one curious and want to pick up the book.

The language is quite good and at the same time the prose does not become as heavy as to intimidate the reader. The work is richly sprinkled with memorable lines, especially on political philosophy. The characters are really well etched and the reader can easily relate to the emotions of the characters. The story maintains a steady pace and the book can be finished in one reading.

The series of events have been plotted quite meticulously and lends an air of plausibility. However personally I am more inclined to agree with Leo Tolstoy that individuals are just pawns in the flow of history and do not really deserve the importance some historians place on them. But any opinions on these matters cannot be anything beyond mere speculations. So personal prejudices aside I fully appreciate the alternate history plotted by Rickie Khosla.

The story could have been much more compelling if the author had taken the point of view of a single character and created an intense conflict running through the novel. Currently the story is laid out like a jigsaw puzzle with things falling in place one by one as we move along. That is an interesting style as well and I am partial to that style as a writer but as a reader I think I prefer the other style.

Many of the characters make brief appearances and one wishes one could have seen more of them. This definitely has scope for a much bigger novel where these characters are explored as well. This book is definitely worth a read for anyone who is in to reading books by current day Indian authors and I would rank it close to top of the pack.

Details of Book and Author

The book link is The Imperative Subterfuge

The author's blog is Who cares what I think?

In the event that you do not have a Kindle you can download apps for reading Kindle books on PCs, laptops and Smartphones from this link
http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771

25 comments:

Rickie said...

Thanks for your kind words of appreciation. Compels me to work harder and be better as a writer!
I absolutely agree that this story can be plotted on a much larger canvas. At some point in the future, I am definitely going to explore that.

The Fool said...

Looking forward to your next novel, Rickie.

Suresh Chandrasekaran said...

Good crisp review TF

vajra said...

Thank you for your impression and recommendation TF. Will try to read it asap.
- Vajra

Rachna said...

Sharp review TF! I agree that certain characters did need more exploring. And yes, your point about a single character's point of view being taken more strongly to intensify conflict is very valid too. Yes, this subject had the potential of a full blown novel.

Diwakar Narayan said...

Nice review, TF. I loved reading it too.

Arvind Passey said...

Why would I want to see more of other characters? I am quite happy with the way Eva and Adolf are moulded from the 'subterfuge' pov. I am quite happy with the size of this work... stretch it and the punches will get harder to maintain.

Arvind Passey
www.passey.info

The Fool said...

It is a matter of taste, Mr. Passey. Isn't that always the challenge ? - delivering punches v/s drawing a reader into a different place and time and making him believe in his experience.

The Fool said...

Thanks Rachna.

The Fool said...

Thanks, Diwa.

The Fool said...

Thanks Suresh,

The Fool said...

You must Vajra.

Deepa said...

Reviews like these are making me want to drop the current book I am reading and start reading this one! I have downloaded it on Kindle, am yet to read it.

The Fool said...

The book takes just a couple of hours if you focus, Deepa. You don't have to drop anything.

Alka Gurha said...

The subject had inherent freshness and novelty. Far far away form what Rickie writes on his blog, this historical fiction was about the unexpected.
This is a balanced and articulate review LF.

The Fool said...

Thanks Alka. I agree.

Ashwini C N said...

I havent read this book, but the theme sounds good. Weaving a fiction from history is an achievement indeed given the fixed opinions people might have. Should probably read this one.

The Fool said...

You must. It after all is from our fellow blogger. If not for anything, we bloggers must support each other.

Pramod said...

I would be reading this book as it sounds interesting and informative .Nice review , BTW !
Thanks for sharing the review mate .

-Pramod

Deepa said...

Read it! :)

umashankar said...

As usual, you have projected well the work of Mr Khosla through your crisp, dispassionate lens. A fan of Neither Hitler nor Gandhi but I may yet pull out that e-book sometime.

The Fool said...

Thanks Pramod. Sure you must read this book.

The Fool said...

Thanks Umashankar. I always look forward to your comments on approval of my posts. You should try Rickie's book. It is quite a small one. Should not take more than an hour.

indu chhibber said...

Your concise but comprehensive review motivates me to read it.It is so different from his blog posts.

The Fool said...

Do read it, Indu. It is is an interesting read.

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